The perfect choice of one-stop service for diversification of architecture.

Guide to Shop Digah Company in Digah House Company

Guide to Shop Digah Company in Digah House Company

2021-06-16
Digah Company
40

On this page, you can find quality content focused on Digah Company. You can also get the latest products and articles that are related to Digah Company for free. If you have any questions or want to get more information on Digah Company, please feel free to contact us.

Guangzhou House Empire Construction&Furnishing Co.,Ltd upholds the highest standard in the manufacturing of Digah Company. We establish an internal quality control team to inspect every step of production, request external third-party certification bodies to conduct audits, and invite customers to pay visits to our factory per year to achieve this. Meanwhile, we adopt advanced production technology to improve the quality of the product.Through Digah Company brand, we continuously create new value for our customers. This has been achieved and is also our vision to the future. It is a promise to our customers, markets, and society ─ and also to ourselves. By engaging in process co-innovation with customers and society as a whole, we create value for a brighter tomorrow.Samples of our products including Digah Company are available at Digah Company. It is advisable that customers contact our staff for getting to know more detailed information to ask for product samples.
recommended articles
Related Blogs blog
Pros and Cons of Self-Ordering Kiosks | Intuiface Blog
Pros and Cons of Self-Ordering Kiosks | Intuiface Blog
Be it for ordering food at a quick-service restaurant or checking out at a retail shop, customers are getting more and more familiar with the idea of being served by interactive kiosk installations.Since the 80s, when self-service kiosks were first brought into retail stores by the shoe retailer Florsheim Shoe Co. and the manufacturer ByVideo Inc from California (source), the notion of non-human assistance became in demand for myriads of scenarios. Quantitative proof of that demand? There are plenty. A survey reveals 66% of shoppers prefer self-service and self-checkout than human interactions, and 75% prefer to have hand-held or fixed devices to check inventory availability and prices to improve speed and convenience while shopping. Heres another: 95% of consumers want to be left alone while shopping (source). Yes, it quickly comes down to the conclusion that self-service kiosks are much admired today.But when concerning the QSR industry, surprising facts lie on the flip side. Only 25% of restaurant customers have used a self-ordering kiosk between May and July this year (source), and only 33% of larger QSR brands (more than 1,000 locations) have integrated self-service kiosks into their stores (source). When considering the long line of survey evidence, self-service kiosks should be an integral part of the quick-service restaurant environment, and customers appear to be ready to welcome this new way of service.Although some level of a noticeable turn towards implementing self-service systems did happen in the industry over the last decade, with many business success stories generated by big-name brands singing the victory, the rate of integration, in reality, seems to be lagging behind expectations.Where is such a discrepancy coming from?We know we can all be hesitant about replacing what we have been accustomed to with something out of our experience, especially when the change will have concrete impacts on business performance and results. Adopting self-ordering kiosks is no exception and frankly speaking, caution is understandable. To whichever degree, there is additional cost to buying or DIYing the installations (vs doing nothing at all), and there will be learning curves for the business and its staff to learn how to use kiosks effectively. So yes, we are talking about a dicey ride with real risk and work, not some conjuring trick. At the same time, this is why we need to review the benefits and challenges of self-ordering kiosks using real-world facts and observations in order to construct sober predictions and help ourselves reach the right decision about adoption.Below is the list of pros and cons for adopting self-ordering kiosks based on our experience of working with 1500 digital signage solution providers from 70 countries around the world.1) Improved accuracyThe overall accuracy of service improves as customers are provided with visual content and detailed information about what exactly they are ordering. Kiosks eliminate human to human miscommunication. No more, he said she said. Accounting accuracy and speed also improves for all types of payments. Theres no comparison to be made when it comes to the math capacity of computers vs. humans. 2) Reduced wait timeWhen making an order with a cashier, the customer has to specify the items, then the cashier records the order while processing the payment, followed by repeating the order and cost to confirm. All those in line are forced to wait unattended. Isnt the point of eating at a QSR restaurant to be quick? Heres where self-ordering kiosks come in handy. They can largely reduce this wait time as they process every order with no delay, directly controlled by the customers. In the meantime, staff from the register can move to service other parts of the customer experience. Read on to find out how self-ordering kiosks can help optimize resources. 3) Optimization of resources (and employees)Let the machines do the jobs that require accuracy, efficiency, information and consistency. While self-ordering kiosks do the repetitive task of walking customers through the menu and processing orders, staff can be rearranged to do what humans do better: assembling the orders, keeping the restaurant clean, engaging with guests to make sure they are satisfied, and serving food to the table. How can QSR business afford to have both the self-ordering kiosks and the employees? Read on. 4) Increase in salesWhats more important than making profitable sales in doing business? Not to worry, self-ordering kiosks can boost sales. There are two explanations for this. First, up-selling. The upselling effort through employees requires consistency and the labor of training employees for persuasion skills, but self-ordering kiosks do it consistently and automatically by displaying all available and relevant add-ons or menu options for each selected item, so the likelihood of customers increasing the size of the final check increases. Second is the science of customer emotion. Finger movements on touchscreens generate novelty and fun, creating experiential and effective feelings in alignment with the playfulness and emotional nature of indulgent QSR-type products (source). The positive emotional connection leads to customer retention, which accounts for 25% to 100% of brand revenue and profitability (source).Similarly, the idea of self-ordering hands over the steering wheel to the customer with a sense of privacy by removing the need for human interaction in the ordering scenario. This means freedom to order without any disturbance of possible interpersonal judgment.5) Information sharingUnlike the printed menu with limited space and static content, self-ordering kiosks can provide customers with detailed information about products and services. Customers can conveniently obtain pricing, nutrition, and store information without having to chase down a staff member or causing a register queue. Information sharing leads to customer empowerment and customer empowerment leads to greater retention.6) Personalized experienceFirst things first, personalized experiences are the key to increased revenue and customer loyalty. Studies prove that customers are likely to do business with a company if it offers personalized experiences (source). Then the question arises: What are the odds that machines are better at providing personalized experience than people themselves? The answer? Very likely.Customers expect brands to recognize, remember, and provide them with relevant offers and recommendations in a consistent manner. Hate to break the news, but computers are completely out of our league when it comes to remembering and being consistent while we, as emotional animals, possess the tendency to forget and be influenced by circumstances. By adopting self-ordering kiosks powered by data analytics capability, brands can log every event happening on the screen, generate and report customer insights and installation performance to provide not only personalized experiences but also to consistently improve service quality.CONS1) Limited customizationThe majority of self-ordering kiosk content creation platforms available today offer standardized templates with lack of customizability, leaving many brands to present similar visual identities through the digital installation. This could be a hindering factor in adopting self-ordering kiosks especially when a brand has specific spatial, technical, and branding requirements. The need for frequent content updates can also cause reluctance in adopting self-ordering kiosks when the content management platform can make the job slow and complicated. Fortunately, these hindrance factors are eliminated thanks to some of the latest technologies that support constraint-free work environments within modern, no-coding authoring tools.2) The cost issueInvesting in the initial set-up and committing to the on-going maintenance of self-ordering kiosks can definitely be a risky business unless it spells real bang for the buck. How can a business justify that cost?First, consider the long term return. A proven fact is that self-ordering kiosks can boost sales. One study found that consumers spend as much as 30% more when they order through self-service kiosks. Lets say a business used to make $100,000 in total sales monthly. The additional 30% would bring $360k more in sales every year, which would mean that every 3 and a half years, the business will gain a year worth sales in extra. Does that sound like a good payback?Another way to justify the investment is by decreasing the cost while still pursuing the quality. Conventional belief is that delivering truly gratifying kiosk services delivering all the pros mentioned earlier requires custom development which costs more money and time. While this might have been true in early days of digital signage, advanced software platforms of today such as Intuiface, minimize resource and cost requirements while maximizing value: extraordinary multi-touch capabilities, data-driven, modern design options, high reliability, fast implementation, robust deployment infrastructure, detailed usage analytics. Remember: without pursuing quality, you almost guarantee investment failure. Source: The Complete Guide to Doing Business With Intuiface3) Displacement of workersIn an ideal world, self-ordering kiosks would accelerate profit, and the business would recirculate the benefit into enriching resources including its employees while still securing margin for itself. In reality? Displacement of workers should not inherently be a cons if that is one of the goals. Adopting self-ordering kiosks means letting technology do the jobs they are good at while releasing staff to do what humans do better optimizing resources rather than compromising them. And keep in mind, as mentioned earlier yes, 66% of shoppers prefer self-service and self-checkout than human interactions, but 34% are not happy about self-checkout and still expect human interaction. So businesses need to serve these customers too and consider human interaction as a vital part of their service.4) Content management difficultyIts not an overstatement to say that content is the heart-blood of a self-ordering kiosk, without which the entire installation becomes useless. And yet, the work of content management, let alone the initial content development, can become inconvenient or difficult, leading to business apathy decreasing their attention to detail and rigor of process. Nobody wants to stick a Post-it note on a snazzy new display to make corrections because the alternative seems worse.These unappealing factors derive from two main factors: 1) lack of tech-savviness 2) inefficient or poorly featured content management tool. The good news is there are tools that simplify the process of adopting and maintaining self-ordering kiosks. Content management can be easier and instrumental for business profit by using software with the following content management capabilities:Extensibility: enabling agile and flexible communication between diverse content sources.Creative freedom: enabling users to configure, animate, and design anything. Measurability: intuitive and convenient data collection and analysis to deliver insight and assessment at ones fingertips.Remote management: enabling users to manage and deploy content from anywhere in the world.Connection Freedom: Giving users the option to pull the Internet cord. freeing them from downtime concerns. and all this throughOriginally published at RELATED QUESTION What happens if you fire a gun where one barrel is smaller than the other? Two different possibilities and Iu2019ll spend a bit of time on the more interesting.The first possibility is you have a very exciting, one shot rifle.For the first 1/1500 seconds or so, life is good. And then it goes down hill in a hurry. The bullet hits the restricted diameter and decelerates while the gases behind it are still of a mind to expand. Most of the photos you find on the web of exploded barrels are from shotguns and youu2019ll be dealing with something a lot more photogenic than that. Shotgun barrels are relatively thin and will rupture comparatively easily. A . 50 is a different beast. Itu2019s going to take some pressure to rupture but that pressure will certainly be available when that bullet stops. Youu2019ll quickly find out where the weakest point is and the resultant explosion could certainly be lethal if people are next to it and catch some shrapnel.The other possibility is the early wannabe of a sabot round. The Germans did the most work with it in WW2 developing 3 systems (the Brits fielded one). With todayu2019s technology a gun/bullet could certainly be developed though I donu2019t know it would have great utility. First some history and what we can glean from it. The idea is pretty simple. A round with a hard penetrator is encased in a flanged casing composed of relatively soft metal. As it goes down the barrel, the soft material compresses in response to the tapered barrel. The large initial diameter means the shell can contain a lot of propellant and as the barrel diameter reduces, this large gas mass is used to propel a relatively small diameter round with no gas leakage. This sub-diameter round has significantly greater velocity than a full diameter round because it has a smaller mass but is propelled by the same amount of propellant.The smallest German gun is the 2.8cm S PzB 41. It compressed the shot from 28mm to 20mm, a reduction of 28%, with a 1402 m/s muzzle velocity. This compares with 1050 m/s for the German KwK 2. 0cm cannon. The second was the 4. 2cm le. Pak 41. It compressed the shot from 42mm to 30mm, 28%, and had a 1265 m/s muzzle velocity. There isnu2019t a comparible 42mm non-tapered cannon to compare it with.The last German gun was the 7.5cm Pak 41. This gun tapered from 75mm to 55mm, 27%, and had a 1230 m/s velocity compared to the 790 m/s of the 75mm Pak 40. Fast forwarding to todayu2019s world, we could develop something like this for a .50 round tapering down to .25u2033. Weu2019re shooting for a 50% reduction, not a 28% so the penetrator would end up being pretty darn small, a fair amount below .25u2033. I donu2019t know how to estimate its velocity since it doesnu2019t scale at all with the above which gave increases of 33% - 55%. But it would certainly have a nice speed bump, of that Iu2019m certain. Unfortunately, it would end up giving it pretty crappy ballistics because it would weigh so little. Also, resistance goes mostly as the square of the velocity so this little screamer would run afoul of Bernoulli pretty quickly. While making a sabot is the obvious way weu2019d try and duplicate the performance, it might be possible to develop a non-sabot approach to having the flanges get ground down or in some other manner not have to fully compress in order that the penetrator could have marginally greater diameter. But truthfully, this approachu2019s time has past and going the sabot route is the practical way to get a sub-caliber round to high velocity.The military has gone that route and the velocity gain is pretty impressive. Thinking about it, the projectile here is .30u2033 so if we taper the barrel down to .15u2033 and then fire one of these babies, u2026What happens if you fire a gun where one barrel is smaller than the other?.
(Functional) OOP with Message Passing
(Functional) OOP with Message Passing
There is a great misunderstanding of what object-oriented programming really is and its origins. The term "object" was first coined in the 1950s and became really popular on the early 60s on Lisp circles as a powerful design pattern. Finally on the 70s the first object-oriented language, Smalltalk, was developed by Alan Kay.The truth is that what object-oriented programming really represents has been lost over the years as modern languages kept copying the syntax and ideas imposed by the C programming language. Alan Kay has declared publicly many times that the essence of OOP is the concept of message passing, and that modern programming languages focus more on the object notation itself than in the concept of message passing. This of course is the motivation for this article and our focus here will be to show the essence of object-oriented programming using a popular modern programming language, JavaScript. I hope you enjoy this journey.What is a message?Before going deeply into object-oriented implementation it is fundamental to go deeply into the prerequisites. Let's start with messages!So what the hell is a message? When you want to communicate two endpoints you need a standardized information to be passed along the way. A message is this standardized information and is essential to guarantee that the two endpoints will be as decoupled as possible. It is important to notice that if the producer sends a message that the consumer does not understand, nothing happens because it is not a predefined standard.Our problemSuppose I want to grab a student's best grade from a list of grades in all the exams he participated. We could write a silly function to do that without complex functionality, just vanilla JavaScript for the masses:The above code works perfectly, but since we are working with an array as a parameter, it does not sound very semantic. It is not clear that the list of grades belongs to a single student. How do we fix this? Well There are two solutions to this problem:We change the name of the function to getStudentBestGradeWe pass as a parameter the student as an object.Of course, we will focus on the second one! yay!Using the "class" keywordWell, since we are object-oriented programming lovers, we can do it with the class keyword. This is such an easy job anyway:Now the code looks much better as I can simply pass on the student as a parameter and: Bingo! Much better than the previous versionBut this is not the idea behind this article. It looks quite nice but we are using JavaScript object-oriented notation to do that. Why not do it with functions only? So keep on reading :)Our First Functional ObjectTo understand fully what we will be talking about in the next paragraphs, we need to start simple. We will first use the concept of function scope to create a functional counter with a private embedded value.Holy cow, that is a function that returns another function. Don't be scared, this is quite a normal thing to do. I know it may sound absurd for many people, but that is actually very useful. I like to tell people that this first function is a function builder because it lets you create more dynamic functions by simply injecting state into them.Ok, but what the heck is state? Think of state as anything that can cause your functions to output different values for the same input, in this case, the parameter initial does exactly that.As we can see in the example above, for the same counters, every time we call the function we have as output a different value. So just as a review, note that the Counter function builds in the example two functions with private embedded value inside. Isn't that what private attributes on objects do? ;)Now that we understand state injection, we can complicate things a bit more and write a JavaScript-only class using functions only. Why JavaScript only? Because we will use JSON (JavaScript Object Notation).As we can see, we used the same approach as on the counters example. Our function student (that represents our class) receives the grades as a parameter and maintains it as a private attribute _grades. The public methods (getGrades, getBestGrade) of this class are returned as a JSON. Since this class is written using a fancy looking function, there is no need to use the new keyword.This implementation is very common on old JavaScript source codes but is very powerful. But as I promised before, we want to do it the right OOP way, and that means that we need to use the concept of message passing. The message passing implementation is language agnostic and should work on any decent programming language out there.I hope you love this, now is when the real fun begins! Message Passing Object NotationLet's write the same object as before but using the message passing strategy.As we can see, this OOP implementation at first sight does not look very elegant in JavaScript, but I can guarantee it will work on most popular programming languages. The idea is not what this implementation can do differently, but how we can extend this and implement real cool hierarchy and polymorphism (We will do this after the next title).To use the message passing strategy, you have to understand that for each message, the object will have different handlers (functions) that will be specialized in dealing with the message. If we pass no parameters, then we can simply get the function and use it in a more flexible way. Below I show you how you can use the message passing strategy:An advantage of using this object and not the previously declared object, the one using JSON, is the fact that in case we send an invalid message there will be a predefined response for this request that we can model for our domain.Inheritance and PolymorphismFor this example, we need a class to extend from, and there is no other class that looks nicer than Person (I was not very creative really). Since every student is a person, this means that every student should have all attributes and methods from the base class. Below I have implemented the class Person.Since Student needs to extend the base class, we should do some nice things to make it all work out together and produce a nice looking hierarchy:Students must have a name and an age. So for now on, the constructor should also have name and ageOne of the attributes of our class will be the base class that will be constructed with the parameters sent on the Student constructorIf the message we are looking for is not found, we will redirect it to the base class on the default case of the switch.Here we go, ladies and gentlemen! :DFinally, we have a nice little class that extends Person using functions and message passing only. You can use it the same way as before, by sending messages.ConclusionI hope you liked what you read. This article focus on the main idea behind object-oriented notation and how to use message passing. Of course this is a very humble implementation and most languages optimize a lot how classes are represented when they become bits and bytes. There are lots of other things we could implement such as method overload and multiple inheritances, but they are quite an easy task to do once we have these things implemented.References1 OOP v.s. FP codes/til/referential-transparency.·RELATED QUESTIONDo decimal equivalents to binary number values hold significance in software programming?No, there is no meaningful relationship between the decimal and binary notations of the numbers. One is base 10 and the other base 2 and ten is not a power of two. The reason we use base-10 Arabic numerals is probably because have ten fingers and because it's a much better system then Roman numerals. Nobody was thinking about binary digits at the time.However, there is a relationship to hexadecimal numbers, which are base 16. 16 is 2^4 so each digit represents four bits (binary digits). This makes going from hexadecimal to binary and vise versa a snap. For instance, if you know that the hex number A (10 decimal) is 1010, then you know right away how to decode the hex number AAAA: 1010101010101010When you're working with binary numbers and boolean operators hex is a lot more intuitive.150 OR 64 in decimal is very awkward. I can't do that in my head. But 96h OR 40h is no problem. You only have to think about a single nibble. You know that 9d is 1001 and 4 is 0100 so you know you can add 4 and 9 to get the result: 13d, or Dh. So the answer is D6. The translation from D6 into decimal (13 * 16 6214) however is awkward, so it's nice if you can avoid using decimal
Did City Streets Smell of Horse Dung During the Days of Horse-drawn Carriages?
Did City Streets Smell of Horse Dung During the Days of Horse-drawn Carriages?
Did city streets smell of horse dung during the days of horse-drawn carriages?of course they did duh— — — — — —Ever walked the city streets @ 4am? Comments?Comments?— — — — — —Are The Hours Between Four & Six AM The Best Time To Do Burnouts On Local City Streets?Would a .44 Mag be enough to permanently destroy an engine block?— — — — — —How do I get compensated from damages to my car caused by driving on defective city streets, county roads, or state and federal highways?Your best bet is to check with your state's department of transportation. In Rhode Island, motorists that suffer damage to their vehicles due to potholes simply need to file a claim in accordance with the procedures clearly listed on their website— — — — — —Who is at fault for this town hall fight about the privatization of city streets? The lib or con?(video)?Great fight, does Don King represent both these guys? Though the guy in the yellow should have tucked in his elbow a little, that move could cost him in the later rounds— — — — — —HOW TO BUILD CITY STREETS & WALKS - Model Railroader Magazine - Model Railroading, Model Trains, Reviews, Track Plans, and ForumsI am currently building several major asphalt roadways on my layout and have found the following technique to provide excellent results: 1) I first draw the roadway onto the layout surface keeping in mind the way actual roads are laid out and how vehicles would negotiate them so my roads do not appear odd to viewers. You do not want to lay out turns that only a go-kart could negotiate. If in doubt, place a large truck or bus in your problem area and figure out how much room such a vehicle would need to access the area. 2) I next glue 1/4 inch wide strips of .040" styrene along the centerlines of each roadway to create a crown in the final road surface. These strips should meet in a "" at typical roadway intersections. 3) Next, I cut roadway patterns from cardstock to match my roadway dimensions. Several pieces of cardstock can be taped together into a single pattern for complex roadway shapes. 4) Once my cardstock patterns are complete, I trace their outlines onto .040" styrene sheets. I then carefully cut out the styrene road shapes. 5) Prior to gluing the styrene road shapes into position, I use these pieces as patterns to mark and cut my road surface material. I use a product called "Fun Foam" made by a company called "Creatology". This dense 2 mm thick foam product can be found at Michael's in 12" by 18" sheets in various colors (I use black) for under $1 each. It can also be roughed up with sandpaper if a bit more texture is desired. 6) Once I have finished using the styrene roadway base pieces as cutting patterns, I glue them down to the layout surface using latex caulking. I run beads of caulking along each roadway edge and atop the central crown strips then press the styrene sheet pieces into place. It may be necessary to tape down the edges of the styrene sheet pieces until the caulking sets, especially at intersection corners. Once the caulking has cured, I spray the underside of the matching Fun Foam pieces with Elmers Multi Purpose Spray Adhesive then press them into place over the appropriate styrene sheet area. I use Woodland Scenics Foam Putty to fill in joints between pieces of Fun Foam. 7) I usually allow everything to set overnight so that painting the road surface does not affect the adhesives. I next sand down the WS Foam Putty patches smooth with the adjacent Fun Foam surfaces. This product shrinks a little so these joints may need a second application of Foam Putty. 8) Once I am satisfied with the Fun Foam/Foam Putty surface, I paint the roadways a dark to neutral gray depending on how old I want the road surface to look. I use inexpensive acrylic craft paints. These paints tend to firm up the surface of the Fun Foam when dry and also seem to improve the surface texture a little. 9) Using a sharp hobby knife, I next make numerous light surface cuts perpendicular to the roadway edges and centerlines to simulate surface cracks. I try to use as random a pattern and crack shapes as possible. The Fun Foam acts somewhat like a self healing cutting matt in that the cut will shrink a bit. This works well as even deeper than desired cuts eventually return to believable scale size cracks. 10) I next use a black fine tip Sharpie pen to trace over the cracks to simulate tar applied to seal the cracks by road crews. These last two steps are a little time consuming but really add to the realism of the finished roads. 11) I use white and yellow fine tip paint pens to apply the road striping. Be sure to research roadway striping practices for your layout era and locale. I use a spray can of flat white paint and stencils cut from .020" styrene sheet for "Stop" and "RR Crossing" indications painted on the road surface. 12) The final step is to weather the road surfaces. I start by airbrushing a light gray wash along the edges and centerlines to fade the asphalt color and tone down the starkness of the tar sealed cracks. Once I am satisfied with the "aging" of the asphalt, I airbrush a dark gray wash down the center of each lane to simulate grease and oil spray along the normal driving line. Do not forget the right and left turn driving lines at intersections. 13) Add a few vehicles and the roadways are done (except for sidewalks). I am still experimenting with how I will create my sidewalks but I will probably cut them from .040" styrene sheet and place them atop two layers of Fun Foam. When positioned against the edge of one of my roadways described above, the sidewalk surface is about 6 to 8 scale inches above the roadway edge. I will probably add curb faces using strips of .020" styrene cemented to the edge of the styrene sidewalks and sanded flush with the top of the sidewalk. Expansion lines will be added using a hobby knife. One thing I did not describe is how I handle grade crossings. This is where the .040" styrene roadway base really comes in handy. I first run my centerline crown strips fairly close to the railroad track roadbed material but you do not need to get all that close. I then cut the .040" styrene roadway base to fit right up to the edge of the track ties using the RR track roadbed to support the edge of the .040" styrene piece. When I glue down the styrene, I use a few thick beads of caulking between the RR track roadbed and the end of roadway centerline strip to support the styrene in the "transition area" after the caulking cures. Next, I gently press the styrene road base into the caulking several inches away from the crossing and atop only the edge of the styrene where it sits on the RR track roadbed. This allows the styrene base to assume its own smooth grade transition without creating the dreaded "stunt show jump" as the roadway approaches the grade crossing. Having used the styrene road base pieces as patterns for cutting the Fun Foam, the edge of the Fun Foam road surface stops just above the ends of the RR ties leaving room to add your favorite grade crossing materials. I have been very pleased with the look of my roadways as they have realistically smooth elevation changes, nice drainage crowns, good surface detail and just enough variation due to the Fun Foam/Foam Putty surface to not look like they were graded using lasers.
no data
no data
Contact Us
Leave a message
We welcome custom designs and ideas and is able to cater to the specific requirements. for more information, please visit the website or contact us directly with questions or inquiries.
Guangzhou
House Empire Construction&Furnishing Co.,Ltd
no data
Sign Up For The Newsletterus
Copyright © 2018 Guangzhou House Empire Construction&Furnishing Co.,Ltd. | All Rights Reserved Design by www.digahousing.com |Sitemap